I spy with my little eye... Hong Kong Diaries - Part 2.

I will admit that with the jet lag, we didn't manage to wake up before 11am, so we never made it to breakfast. Doesn't mean we didn't enjoy every bit of our hotel: for some reason, I completely fell for their wall paper... 



Eventually we ventured out to go and explore Wanchai. We had lunch at 22 Ships on Ship Street: gastronomical tapas with coffee wasn't the best idea, it was a bit early, but I loved seating and eating on the street!



After lunch we wandered the streets of Wanchai, just to realise that it was clearly a nightlife kind of neighbourhood. There wasn't a lot to see but our walk took us to the financial district where the protests took place. There were only a few umbrellas left, it felt like the only ones left didn't get the memo saying that the meeting point had changed. The roads were empty, it felt like a ghost town. 



The one thing I remember from Wanchai is that it felt less international than Central Hong Kong, I was surprise to see how the balance between oriental and occidental culture varies from one neighbourhood to an other.



With such a packed city, HongKongers have become experts in making the most of every bit of space. Coming from Dubai where space is the one thing we never run out, it is quite impressive.


On our way back to Central, the Gentleman stopped at The Armoury for some bespoke shopping. After turning around the building for a solid 20min, we finally found the entrance and eventually made our way up to the 3rd floor of Pedder Building. Big up for the vintage fabric ties and passionate staff!



Then we headed to Sevva on the rooftop of Prince's building for a cocktail and a fantastic view of Hong Kong. The cocktails were interesting and the sunset, amazing. It is expensive but perfect for a special occasion.


Finally we met K. who moved to Hong Kong a couple of months ago for dinner at Bibo. I would highly recommend it: it is located in an old station, underground, and they managed to gather an amazing amount of art pieces. From Banksy to Kaws, and Tsang Tsoi Choi, there is a strong street art vibe displayed like an accumulation of piece, making the space a visual feast for the eye. What happens in the plate is as explosive as the decor: subtle flavors and lots of colours, I loved it! Oh, and the team is adorable!




The lessons of this 2nd day in Hong Kong:
1- don't believe everything the media say: the Umbrella revolution was nothing threatening from what I experienced. We arrived in Hong Kong at the end of the movement but there was absolutely no reason to feel unsafe, people were peacefully (and passionately) demonstrating. They were eager and happy to share but there was no violence whatsoever. And to be honest, my french revolution history background felt a lot of empathy.
2- you've got to admire Hong Kongers sense of design. The city is a mess but they find ways to make it evolve.
3- Hong Kongers have their own style. You don't see it everywhere but some of them of very edgy, in a very London way: street-style, sharp shapes and fluo colours. My favourite thing to do while seating with a drink watching people pass by was to chase the big eye contact lenses. They love it and it gives the ladies a kawai vibe that I love.

... to be continued...

2 comments:

  1. I totally agree with you. I was also in the protests at the beginning and it was really peaceful and calm. I don't understand why media need to transform the protest as something very violent because it was not. When we see a protest in Europe (In France particularly) the shops are on fire, the windows are broken.. in HK, nothing like this..!!

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  2. @travelbulb: Thanks for the comment. I think Frenchs are beautifully fiery, but we have a lot to learn ;)

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